• YO, Untitled; Shely, 12 x 18 inches, oil on paper mounted on wood, 2013
  • YO, Untitled; Shely, 12 x 18 inches, oil on paper mounted on wood, 2013.
  • YO, Untitled; Shely, 12 x 18 inches, oil on paper mounted on wood, 2013..
  • YO, Untitled; Zuzana, 12 x 18 inches, oil on paper mounted on wood, 2013
  • YO, Untitled; Zuzana, 12 x 18 inches, oil on paper mounted on wood, 2013.
  • YO, Untitled; Zuzana, 12 x 18 inches, oil on paper mounted on wood, 2013..
  • Shely - white
  • Zuzana

Yigal Ozeri

Yigal Ozeri’s (Tel Aviv, Israel,1958) paintings of young women are unusual for their uncanny realism and psychologically engaging presence. This is achieved by Ozeri’s using both still photography and video in their initial stages, and painting the final works with thousands of tiny brushstrokes which animate the paintings’ surfaces.

This series of paintings explores portraits of a timeless young women intricately entwined in the frozen landscapes that surround her. Many of the paintings appear like film stills with Olga caught, unaware, consumed in thought or moving across the icy terrain. In others, Olga gazes directly at the viewer in a somewhat challenging and unsettling manner. In some, all that is visible are fragments of her body – face, limbs, flowing garments. In every painting, Ozeri captures the vulnerability of Olga who is caught in the transitional age between youth and maturity. For the artist, the results of his paintings express his feminine “anima”, Carl Jung’s concept of the essential woman. This psychological presence is the hidden essence of his work.

Ozeri begins his process for these paintings by bringing a photographic crew to diverse landscapes in which he places the young women within the final composition in order to get precisely the results he is seeking. After choosing among the resulting images, he takes these and begins the painting process. The results are cinematic portraits of almost photographic realism. Their carefully staged, conceptual installations reflect the high-definition realism that today pervades media including television and movies; while their almost invisible brushstrokes, in the manner of traditional trompe l’oeil painting, play on concepts of perception and illusion.